Product Reviews

Neutrogena Hydro Boost Sunscreen Review: Ingredients, Before & After

The summer is over, but that doesn’t mean that sunscreens aren’t necessary! My pale self needs sunscreen no matter the season. Finding the right sunscreen isn’t as easy as it seems, which is why I’ve decided to test the Neutrogena’s Hydro Boost Sunscreen.

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What Does It Offer?

Hydro Boost Sunscreen is an SPF 30 and SPF 50 sunscreen that is one of the best-selling sun protection products out there. It’s very affordable, and it’s said to not leave that annoying white cast many sunscreens have a problem with. The product is supposed to be suitable for your face, and it has hydrating effects that can last up to 8 hours.

According to advertisements, this product is supposed to be:

  • Hydrating
  • Hypoallergenic
  • Lightweight
  • Non-greasy
  • Non-comedogenic
  • Water-resistant

What Is the Product Like?

The first thing that is noticeable with any product is the packaging. When it comes to Hydro Boost Sunscreen, the packaging is pretty standard – I’d dare to say even unappealing. Maybe it’s just me, but the blue color doesn’t say ‘sunscreen’ to me. I get it, it’s because of the word ‘hydro,’ but if I haven’t heard of the product beforehand, I probably wouldn’t buy it.

Despite this, Hydro Boost Sunscreen seems to be a pretty decent sunscreen. SPF 50 is always the best choice, especially during the summer. The product also comes in SPF 30, which is okay during the winter, but too low for us pale people when in the summer sun.

The biggest problem that comes with most SPF 50 sunscreens is how thick and greasy the product can be. They take way too long to absorb, and some leave the nasty, white residue that makes us look dirty. SPF 30 tends to be a bit better, but if I burn on the sun if I forget to reapply the product every hour, it’s not worth it. Not to mention that beach smell! Smelling like sunscreen isn’t too bad when on vacation, but I’m not too keen on smelling like that throughout the year,

Hydro Boost Sunscreen, first and foremost, doesn’t have that distinctive smell. It is very scented, but you wouldn’t know it’s a sunscreen and not a hydrating cream. In fact, you can smell a bit of cucumber and melon in it. Refreshing, but not overwhelming.

There really isn’t any difference performance-wise, no matter if you’re using an SPF 30 or SPF 50. Both absorb really fast, and there is no pale residue. I tested it on my husband, who is a lot darker than I am, and there is still nothing to be seen after just 10-15 seconds. There is some slightly purple tint that disappears as soon as the product is absorbed. However, I have to notice that it seems to leave your skin looking a bit matte, even though it’s soft to touch.

Hydro Boost Sunscreen is definitely hydrating, although I fear it can leave someone with oily skin feeling a bit greasy. Still, this is nothing like most drugstore sunscreens that leave you feeling like you’ve soaked yourself into something sticky.

When it comes to sun protection, it’s pretty standard. It’s supposed to be long-lasting if you don’t go swimming. Still, it’s recommended you reapply it after 80 minutes of swimming or sweating, or right after you finish towel drying.

The product is said to stain some fabrics, but I didn’t have that issue. It can leave a white stain if you accidentally place it on your shirt or swimming suit, but you can just wipe the stain off with a wet towel. However, I have found it funny that the product isn’t supposed to be exposed to the direct sun! After some research, though, this is intended for the full packaging, and it doesn’t mean you’re not supposed to go in the sun while wearing it. Another confusion comes with the ‘8 hour wear’ statement. The product leaves you hydrated for 8 hours, but the SPF will only last for 2 hours.

All in all, for a price range, this is quite a decent sunscreen.

Ingredients

Hydro Boost Sunscreen is oil-free, which is excellent news for all you oily skin people that hate feeling greasy! It also doesn’t contain any dyes and parabens. The product contains hyaluronic acid, which is excellent for hydrating the skin. It also contains glycerin, which we all know has anti-aging properties.

However, Hydro Boost Sunscreen, just like most other Neutrogena’s sunscreens, contains oxybenzone. Oxybenzone is a sunscreen filter that can disrupt hormones, and Hydro Boost Sunscreen has 4.5% of it. Another problematic ingredient I have found is alcohol denat, which enables light formulas, but is said to increase inflammation chances.

Keep in mind that most sunscreens aren’t the most natural thing you can put on your skin. When it comes to ingredients, Neutrogena is far from bad compared to many others. Still, it is up to you to decide whether you want to risk it by using products with debatable ingredients.

Is It Vegan And Cruelty-Free?

Neutrogena is not a cruelty-free brand, as it sells its products in mainland China. This also means that Hydro Boost Sunscreen isn’t cruelty-free, and it isn’t vegan.

Before And After


Neutrogena Hydro Boost Sunscreen in SPF 50 is all you need when it comes to skin protection during sunny, summer days.


This sunscreen will leave you hydrated for up to 8 hours, but you’ll still need to reapply it every 2 hours if you want to stay fully protected.


The packaging is pretty basic, and it doesn’t look like a sunscreen to me. It reminds me more of a hydrating cream, if anything.

Conclusion

Neutrogena Hydro Boost Sunscreen in both SPF 30 and SPF 50 is quite a decent sunscreen for its price range. It does feel hydrating, and it won’t grease your skin like most other sun protection products. The smell was one of the more pleasant surprises, as finally, I have found a sunscreen that won’t make me smell like a vacation.

However, it isn’t cruelty-free, which is immediately a turn-off for me. It also has some artificial ingredients, but nothing too bad or out of the ordinary for sunscreens. If you don’t mind the product being tested on animals, this product could indeed be one of the best drugstore sunscreens you can find.

$8.29
$15.99
in stock
14 new from $8.29
as of October 19, 2020 2:20 am
Amazon.com
Free shipping
$15.41
$18.99
in stock
18 new from $13.49
as of October 19, 2020 2:20 am
Amazon.com
Free shipping
$22.98
in stock
11 new from $19.99
as of October 19, 2020 2:20 am
Amazon.com
Free shipping
$29.89
in stock
12 new from $29.00
as of October 19, 2020 2:20 am
Amazon.com
Free shipping

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